CSSMV Receives BBB Eclipse Integrity Award

The Better Business Bureau serving Dayton and the Miami Valley hosted its annual Eclipse Integrity Awards dinner on May 14, 2019. About 500 people joined the organization at the David H. Ponitz Sinclair Center to honor four organizations with the prestigious Eclipse Integrity Awards, five Students of Integrity Award winners, Community Honor recipients, local Torch Award winner and Dave Donaldson Award of Distinction – The “3D” honoree. It also presented its inaugural Spark Award winners. BBB received nearly 650 nominations recognizing the outstanding performance of Miami Valley businesses and nonprofits.

Eclipse Integrity Award Winners

The Eclipse Integrity Awards are presented to businesses featuring strong leadership and team members. Their leadership is committed to ethics, building a culture of high character ethics and unifying team members around ethical practices. The team is dedicated to performance management practices, ethical human resource practices and committed to the community as demonstrated by their community service and support of the BBB ideals.

Lavender Home Care Solutions, the Eclipse Integrity Award winner in the 0-50 employees category, began as a dream a mother and son had to improve the quality of life for seniors through a well-trained family of caregivers. The team takes a personal interest in each client and caregiver. They know honesty and strong moral principles, as well as being “whole and undivided” are what’s needed to build trust. They are constantly learning and growing. The company is involved in many community organizations, such as the Alzheimer’s Association and SICSA. These relationships help raise awareness of seniors’ health and improve the overall quality of life in our community.

James Cox founded Cox Media Group Ohio, the Eclipse Integrity Award winner in the 100+ employees category, with the intention of pioneering a new type of journalism. More than 120 years later, today it’s an integrated broadcasting, publishing and digital media company. Through the years, its adapted to the changing market and practiced the highest in journalistic and ethical standards of integrity. It’s also a model for others in the industry as it has a variety of media platforms operating under one roof. The company not only shares information about the great things happening in our community, but it also donates millions of dollars and media to community projects and organizations.

The Nonprofit Eclipse Integrity Awards are presented to nonprofits or charities which demonstrate outstanding community service through their mission and accomplishments, demonstrate excellence in programs and fiscal stewardship, operate with integrity through ethical leadership and a strong team, are transparent in their communications and value the power of collaborations/partnerships. Their actions make a positive impact on the vitality and overall health of our community while supporting the ideals of BBB.

Crayons To Classrooms, the Nonprofit Eclipse Integrity Award winner in the 0-50 employees category, provides free school supplies to teachers of students in need. In fact, it’s distributed over 17 million in free school supplies across the Greater Miami Valley. Today, it serves more than 3,000 teachers in 110 schools with enrollment of over 40,000 students. The organization’s employees are passionate about the work they do and the lives they help. They are committed to the success of the organization, teachers, students and each other. They understand that Crayons To Classroom’s continued success depends on the trust clients, supporters and community have in it.

Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley, Nonprofit Eclipse Integrity Award winner in the 75+ employees category, offers assistance to people in need. Programs include early childhood education, pregnancy and parenting support, refugee resettlement, senior services, poverty alleviation services and more. Today, it serves more than 20,000 clients annually in a 10-county service area. The staff provides excellence through professional expertise and the balance of a caring spirit. Collaboration and creativity are valued and welcomed because they help the organization better meet challenges faced by clients. The team delivers quality services, invites volunteerism and financial support and is a trustworthy steward of funding, making it an organization that’s gained the public’s trust.

More Ohioans Now Legally Required to Report Suspected Elder Abuse

News from the Ohio Department of Aging and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services: 


Starting on Sept. 29, Ohio law greatly expands the number of individuals required to report suspicions of elder abuse, neglect or exploitation. Mandatory reporters now include many more individuals in the financial services, legal and medical professions – for example, pharmacists, dialysis technicians, firefighters, first responders, building inspectors, CPAs, real estate agents, bank employees, financial planners and notary publics.

“This expansion of mandatory reporters will help us in our goal of protecting our vulnerable family members, friends and neighbors from harm,” said Cynthia Dungey, director of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS), which supervises Ohio’s Adult Protective Services (APS) program. “Older adults make up the fastest-growing segment of Ohio’s population so all of us need to be vigilant. If you suspect that elder abuse, neglect or exploitation might be occurring, please report it.”

“We work with state and local partners to ensure that our elders are able to live independently, and with dignity and respect, in their homes and communities for as long as possible,” added Beverley Laubert, director of the Ohio Department of Aging. “Each of us must feel empowered to speak up when we suspect that a neighbor, friend or loved one might be the subject of abuse, neglect or exploitation. Likewise, we deserve to know that people who serve our elders daily will take action when they spot warning signs.”

The law changes also require ODJFS to develop and make available educational materials for mandatory reporters. As a result, the agency developed guidebooks for financial services professionals, legal and law enforcement professionals, medical professionals and the public.

Anyone in Ohio can report possible elder abuse 24/7 by calling 1-855-OHIO-APS or by contacting the nearest county department of job and family services (JFS). To find the nearest county JFS, visit jfs.ohio.gov/county. Physical proof or other evidence is not required. Reports can be made anonymously.

If mandatory reporters fail to report possible abuse, they could face criminal charges and fines of up to $500. Ohio law allows no exceptions for professional relationships – for example, doctor/patient relationships or attorney/client relationships.

Elder abuse can include physical, sexual or psychological abuse, as well as neglect, abandonment or financial exploitation. In addition to physical injuries, the following are just a few of the possible indicators: being isolated, missing appointments, appearing frightened or avoiding specific people, suddenly withdrawing from usual activities or interactions, changes in mood or temperament, changes in personal hygiene, or being resistant to touching.

For more information, see the publication “A Guide to Protecting Ohio’s Elders” (JFS 08025), which is available at www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/pubs/. Industry-specific guides for financial services professionals, legal and law enforcement professionals, and medical professionals will be available soon.

Learn more about elder abuse, including how to recognize warning signs and who to call is you suspect abuse, neglect or exploitation, visit the Ohio Department of Aging’s Elder Abuse webpage at www.aging.ohio.gov/elderabuse.

# # #

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services manages vital programs that strengthen Ohio families. These include job training and employment services, unemployment insurance, cash and food assistance, child care, child and adult protective services, adoption, and child support services.

The Ohio Department of Aging serves and advocates for the needs of Ohioans age 60 and older, as well as their families, caregivers and communities. Programs include home and community based long-term supports and services, as well as initiatives to promote health and wellness throughout the lifespan.